Marple, All Saints Church

Church Tower

The detached tower at All Saints, Marple.

The detached tower at All Saints Church, Marple, is home to a fine ring of 8 bells. The original six bells, cast in 1731 by Abraham II Rudhall, were from Stockport Parish Church. They were installed here in 1816. Two trebles were added in 1963 cast by John Taylor and Co. of Loughborough when the existing Rudhall bells were rehung and the tower strengthened following demolition of the church.

The tower was part of a church built in 1811. However, during the 1870s it was found that the church was too small and the building was not suitable for extension. A new church was built 30 metres to the south of the existing building. Used for occasional services up to 1964, the original church was demolished as the building was unsafe.

About The Bells

Dedication: All Saints
Bells: 8 bells. Tenor 691 kg in F – A ground floor ring in a detached tower
Association: Chester Diocesan Guild
Practice Night: Monday (no time is given)
Sunday Ringing: Not Known.
Address: 155 Church Lane, Marple. SK6 7LD (Google Maps)

Visiting The Church

There is a good car park accessed from Church Lane on the south side of the church.

Julie McDonnell Doubles

Lancashire Association
Blackburn, Lancashire
Cathedral Church of St Mary the Virgin
Thursday, 28 December 2017 in 45 m  (8–1–6 in A)
1,260 Julie McDonnell Doubles

  1. Tom Hickson
  2. Rob A Chapman
  3. Charlotte Ferguson
  4. Melanie Chapman
  5. Raymond A Hutchings (C)
  6. John E Bark

Rung on the front 6. Rung to support the Strike Back Against Blood Cancer Cathedrals, Minsters and Abbeys challenge.

From right to left: Tom, Rob, Charlotte, Melanie, Ray & John.

Liverpool Cathedral

12 bells; 82-0-11 in Ab

There is a bourdon bell, Great George, and a ring of thirteen bells hung in the central tower at Liverpool Cathedral. The thirteen ringing bells, a twelve with a sharp second, were all cast in 1939 by Mears and Stainbank. The tenor bell, which weighs in at 82 cwt (82-0-11) and is A♭, is the heaviest ringing bell in the world. This gives Liverpool Cathedral the unique honour of being the heaviest twelve, ten, eight and six.

Everything about Liverpool Cathedral, including the ring of bells, is pretty stunning. The ringing chamber is vast and the bells are rung from a brick and wood platform about three feet above floor level in a ringing chamber 8 floors up.

The ringing room and platform at Liverpool Cathedral.

Ringing the bells is an experience.

About The Bells

The Concrete
radial frame and the Cathedral bells.

Dedication: Liverpool, The Cathedral Church of Christ
Bells: 13 bells. Tenor 82-0-11 in A♭
Association: Lancashire Association / Liverpool Branch
Practice Night: Saturday 6 pm to 7.30 pm
Sunday Ringing: Generally, 1.30 pm to 3 pm on the first Sunday. 9.30 am to 10.30 am on the third Sunday.
Address: St James Mount, Liverpool. L1 7AZ

Visiting The Cathedral

There is a large car park beside the Cathedral. The entrance is via Cathedral Gate. Parking is normally free for visiting bell ringers. Ask at the tower for more information.

Find Liverpool Cathedral on Google Maps

Hearing the bells being rung

There are various clips of the bells being rung available on YouTube. Here are a few of video recordings I have made.

East Crompton, Saint James

S James, East Crompton. 8 bells. 9-3-15

Also known as Shaw, Greater Manchester. There are eight bells hung in the tower at Saint Jame’s Church. All of the bells were cast in 1955 by Mears & Stainbank. The bells are rung from the ground floor.

 

About The Bells

Dedication: Saint James
Bells: 8 bells. Tenor 9-3-15 (588 kg) in G♯ – A ground floor ring
Association: Lancashire Association / Rochdale Branch
Practice Night: Wednesday (no time is given)
Sunday Ringing: Not Known.
Address: Saint Jame Shaw, Shaw. OL2 7TD

Visiting The Church

There is parking on nearby streets and a small car park at the junction of Milnrow Road and Salts Street to the east of the church.

Cow Lane

One of Leyland’s ‘lost’ roads

Cow Lane

Cow Lane, Aerial Photograph from 1929

Introduction

As far as I can tell, Cow Lane existed until development work on the Broadfield estate wiped it out during the early 1970s. Having said that, there are still signs that it existed if you know where to look. This is a series of photographs  I have taken showing some of those signs.

Clearly shown and named on the 1841 O/S First Issue map, Cow Lane runs from east to west starting at the southern end of Towngate down to Stanning’s Bleach Works at Shrugs. The aerial photograph shows Cow Lane starting from its junction with Towngate, heading across fields and bending around land at the bottom of Spring Gardens.

Towngate

The southern end of Towngate no longer exists and has become a car park outside of the modern Tesco’s superstore. The original line of Towngate can still be seen in the various pedestrian crossings and gaps in the wall. The junction with Cow Lane is now replaced by a number of planters.

The Junction of Towngate and Cow Lane.

The line of Cow Lane heads due west from here for a short distance before turning to the north-west and heading down to the petrol filling station and Leyland Leisure Centre. A pedestrian crossing marks the original line of Cow Lane.

The Line of Cow Lane.

This pedestrian crossing marks the original line of Cow Lane. From here it ran in a north-west direction and passed to the south side of Tesco’s Petrol Station before crossing the modern Lancastergate and then passing through the modern Lee Rigby building. As Cow Lane reached the grassy area at the with trees at the junction of Lancastergate and Broadfield Drive it turned and headed almost due west crossing Broadfield Drive where it turned at a right angle and headed due north along what is now called Broadfield Walk.

Broadfield Walk

As Cow Lane headed north there was a stone wall separating the road from Shruggs. A small portion of this will can still be seen along Broadfield Walk between Nursery Close and the back entrance to the Catholic Church.

Part of the wall on the western side of Cow Lane.

Elmwood Avenue

There a strong signs of Cow Lane in Elmwood Avenue. Two of the houses, at the junction with Broadfield Drive, still have kerb stones and stone sets in place. I can also remember seeing part of a street sign frame where Cow Lane turns off to the north along Broadfield Drive.

Remnants of Cow Lane can be seen in the gardens of two houses in Elmwood Avenue.

November 4th

Two peals separated by 40 years.

Peal 001

Kent County Association
Minster (Sheppey), Kent
St Mary and St Sexburga
Friday, 4th November 1976 in 3h 04 (10–2–0 in G)
5,760 Plain Bob Minor
1 x 2,160 and 5 x 720 each called differently

  1. Christopher I Pearson
  2. Julie A Gardner
  3. Neil K Moring
  4. Howard Gardner
  5. Raymond A Hutchings
  6. Phillip R J Barnes (C)

First peal: 1, 2, 3 and 5
Longest length: 4 & 6
First peal as conductor: 6

Peal 901

Lancashire Association
Worsley, Greater Manchester
St Mark
Friday, 4th November 2016 in 3h 08 (24–0–7 in D)
5,000 Edenfield Surprise Royal
Composed by A M Barber

  1. James E Andrews
  2. Jane Owen
  3. Carol A Marchbank
  4. Peter C Randall (C)
  5. Gail L Randall
  6. Colin Woods
  7. Raymond A Hutchings
  8. Brian J Owen
  9. Derek J Thomas
  10. Trevor W Marchbank

Rung on the 40th anniversary of first peal: 7
900th peal: 6
100th together: 7 & 8.

Andrea’s 1st Quarter

Quarter peal 358

Lancashire Association
Blackburn, Lancashire
St Jude
Tuesday, 30 August 2016 in 44m (6–0–25 in D♭)
1,260 Plain Bob Doubles

  1. L Martin Daniels
  2. Bob Moody
  3. Raymond A Hutchings (C)
  4. Ian Fowler
  5. Graham Barnes
  6. Andrea Robinson

Rung on the back six by members of the regular Sunday service band. First quarter peal: 6.

¼ peal band at Saint Jude's, Blackburn

¼ peal band at Saint Jude’s, Blackburn following Andrea’s first quarter peal.

2 x 400

It’s not often I get to ring a 400th peal with anyone, so I thought these two were worth a special mention.

Peal 880

Lancashire Association
Middleton, Greater Manchester
St Leonard
Friday 18 March 2016 in 2h48 (11-2-8 in F♯)
5,152 Darmstadtium Surprise Major
Comp. Roger Baldwin

  1. Brian J Owen
  2. James E Andrews
  3. Jane Owen
  4. Gail L Randall
  5. Peter C Randall (C)
  6. Raymond A Hutchings
  7. Derek J Thomas
  8. Peter G Bellamy-Knights

400th peal together: 5,6

Peal 895

Lancashire Association
Middleton, Greater Manchester
St Leonard
Friday 9 September 2016 in 2h 53 (11-2-8 in F♯)
5,088 Stanstead Mountfitchet Surprise Major
Comp. D F Morrison (No. 2056)

  1. Peter C Randall (C)
  2. Anne C Orme
  3. Derek J Thomas
  4. Raymond A Hutchings
  5. Gail L Randall
  6. James E Andrews
  7. C Michael Orme
  8. Peter G Bellamy-Knights

Rung to celebrate the recent ordination of Karen Hamnett, Curate OLM, and Diane Taylor-Harrison, reader, both members of this congregation. Also a birthday compliment to John P Partington, former member of this peal band. 400th peal together: 4,6

Peal 884

Lancashire Association
Farnworth and Kearsley, Greater Manchester
St John
Friday, 22 April 2016 in 2h 47 (12–1–8 in G)
5090 90th Birthday Surprise Major
Composed by D F Morrison (no. 6905)

  1. Derek J Thomas
  2. Jane Owen
  3. Peter C Randall (C)
  4. Raymond A Hutchings
  5. Gail L Randall
  6. James E Andrews
  7. Brian J Owen
  8. Peter G Bellamy-Knights

Rung on the Eve of the Feast of St George to celebrate the 90th birthdays of H.M. the Queen and of Mr Joe Thornley, for many years tower captain at Farnworth, who was instrumental in the casting/installation of the present ring for the Queen’s Coronation.

Middleton, Saint Leonard

The Parish Church of Saint Leonard, Middleton.

There are nine bells hung in the tower at Saint Leonard’s Church. The oldest of these is the Sanctus bell, 0-2-24 in F#, was cast in 1614 by Robert Orwell.  Of the eight ringing bells the current back six bells, 3 – 8, were cast in 1714 by Abraham I Rudhall. The two trebles were added in 1891, by Mears and Stainbank, to form the current ring of eight.

A peal of 5,300 Anniversary Surprise Major  was rung in September 2014 with the following footnote to mark the 300th anniversary:

This peal is dedicated to the 300th Anniversary of the back six bells at Middleton, which were cast in 1714 by Abraham Rudhall of Gloucester.
Two additional treble bells were added in 1891, funded by public subscription, to augment to the current eight.

The curious-looking wooden belfry was added on top of the medieval tower in 1666. According to Saint Leonard’s website this was to enable a new set of bells to be added.

About The Bells

Dedication: Saint Leonard
Bells: 8 bells. Tenor 11-2-18 (588 kg) in F♯
Association: Lancashire Association / Rochdale Branch
Practice Night: Monday 8pm – 9pm
Sunday Ringing: 10.15am – 10.45am
Address: New Lane, Middleton, Lancashire. M24 6BW

Visiting The Church

There is a large car park at the church when accessed from New Lane.

Find Saint Leonard’s on Google Maps